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Swimkick

When And What To Charge For Articles?

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Hi! I have written some magazine articles and guest posts for blogs recently. They were done in exchange for the recognition as an expert in my field to help boost readership and Klout score. My question is this: What criteria do you use to charge for writing articles and blog posts? How much do you charge? Also, do you use a contract? I would rather ask this question before I need to request payment for my work. Thanks!

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I'm not sure I understand. If you've written for magazines, they post is they pay a fee or not. I don't believe you can charge them anything. Have never heard of it working this way.

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If I understand correctly, you've been writing for free just to establish yourself, and now you're looking to move on to for pay work as a freelance writer, but would like to have an idea of how to do so in a professional manner.

 

That being the case, as Lynn was saying, their rates are posted on their websites Some are flat rate, while some are per word. It will all depend upon the publication. Depending on their financial state, you'll see wide variance between these rates, so prepare for a learning adventure! After a few months of this, you'll be telling the rest of us what to do!

 

As for contracts, the way it usually works, whether for fiction or nonfiction, they usually provide the contracts or stated terms which you then roll with unless you have a readership to bring along with you. Other than that, publications get so many writers following the dream that they rarely are in a mood to negotiate.

 

My suggestion is either the Google this question or head over to Writers Digest and take a look at all of the books they have on the topic of the business of writing. Also, they have offer online courses over there on freelance writing as well.

 

Best of luck!

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I want go with the suggestions of suspense writer. I believe the issue is if you are ready to write for the rates being decided by the magazines.

 

Another way you might have a slight rate control is when you want to write for new niche magazines, especially if they are Christian magazines.

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I'm not sure I understand. If you've written for magazines, they post is they pay a fee or not. I don't believe you can charge them anything. Have never heard of it working this way.

I've overheard conversations at writers conferences about this subject and evidently, there are some that don't have clear guidelines. I would like to be able to at least cover my own expenses at some point. My husband plans to retire next year, so I want to help financially through my writing. Yes, writing is a ministry, but if we are "worth our salt" there is a reasonable consideration for modest compensation so we can spend the time needed to put out quality work that speaks to people's hearts.

 

Right now, I am simply asking the question for in the future. The two I've written articles for their online publications were up front. I would like some sort of guidelines or suggestions.

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If I understand correctly, you've been writing for free just to establish yourself, and now you're looking to move on to for pay work as a freelance writer, but would like to have an idea of how to do so in a professional manner.

 

That being the case, as Lynn was saying, their rates are posted on their websites Some are flat rate, while some are per word. It will all depend upon the publication. Depending on their financial state, you'll see wide variance between these rates, so prepare for a learning adventure! After a few months of this, you'll be telling the rest of us what to do!

 

As for contracts, the way it usually works, whether for fiction or nonfiction, they usually provide the contracts or stated terms which you then roll with unless you have a readership to bring along with you. Other than that, publications get so many writers following the dream that they rarely are in a mood to negotiate.

 

My suggestion is either the Google this question or head over to Writers Digest and take a look at all of the books they have on the topic of the business of writing. Also, they have offer online courses over there on freelance writing as well.

 

Best of luck!

Thank you. I am looking for guidelines for in the future, but am looking now.

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General rule of thumb- if they don't post clear, concise guidelines and if they don't pay at least $.05 per word, then don't submit unless you're trying to establish creds.

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I discovered more on this topic recently. A newer online magazine contacted me to write articles for them, but they wanted to know what I would charge. After a few exchanges, I asked a friend who is an online managing editor for a magazine (not my niche) what is considered fair and sent her a copy of the emails. She recommended to never take less than $.03 per word since I've written for magazines before. When I gave them my bottom-line price, they countered with $.01-.02 per word writing three to five articles per week! @Suspensewriter, thank you for your guideline. There really are some online publications that might ask for our charges, especially for newer magazines and blogs.

 

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@Swimkick Please let me be the first to congratulate you. If you have only written a few pro-bono pieces and you are already being contacted to do work... BRAVA!! You must be phenomenal. I am very excited for you.

 

I found several wonderful articles online that listed publications that pay for submissions, and I have been pursuing them myself as a way to get my personal platform established. I believe what @suspensewriter was referring to would be their one time, pay as you go submission deals. His rates are on par with what I have found. 

 

If I am understanding you right, what you are talking about is basically a contract for regular submissions; basically they are hiring you to write (non-exclusively) for them. If that is the case then, in my opinion, .01 - .02 cents a word is not a bad deal. As long as you are NON-EXCLUSIVE. Especially since you are just starting out. 

 

God bless dear! I am so proud for you.

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16 hours ago, MS.Serena.Fox said:

If you have only written a few pro-bono pieces and you are already being contacted to do work... BRAVA!! You must be phenomenal. I am very excited for you.

 

You are so right Serena!  Excellent point.

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Thank you, @MS.Serena.Fox and @suspensewriter, but I'm not phenomenal, but I do get my content out. I've written for a Christian publication for a couple of years pro bono, but it has given me practice. What happened with this case and a couple of other groups who contacted me: I blog about Christian health, fitness, and wellness, so it attracted the attention of three publications and a medical blog. Sometimes, when they want a fresh perspective, the peruse blogs. In the case of the paid offer, I turned it down for a couple of reasons: one publication this editor represented has articles with sex tips, some of the readers are teen girls and college students; the other they wanted me to write about fashion and makeup tips, not my arena. They expected me to churn out a crazy amount of content for next to nothing. I cannot put out that steady of a stream of content with my other writing responsibilities and health conditions. I just wanted to report back what happened after my initial request.

 

I highly recommend that every writer have a blog without giving away all of your book content. Have a "Hire Me" page. Manage SEO well to have your website come up on the first two pages of Google search (mine is a work in progress). Write well on the topics of your platform. Have a couple of good editors you can call upon. Eventually, you might get an email with a writing offer.

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