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  2. lynnmosher

    Prayers

    Oh, my! Well, just know that all these prayers surround you and angels will guard you and all the others. Just trust the Lord to do so. He will be your strong tower.
  3. Yesterday
  4. Seth Kendrick

    Prayers

    Lynn, I’m scared because my school has a bunch of law enforcement kids (me included) whose parents are prominent officials within our community. My best friend who goes to another school, is the child of a former New Mexican police officer. And some of the kids he trained graduated from schools near mine.
  5. Alley

    More Mangled Language Uses

    We still say chomping at the bit, and we all know what it means.
  6. Rebecca

    Prayers

    Praying here, too.
  7. Alley

    Prayers

    We'll definitely be praying for you. In God have I put my trust: I will not be afraid what man can do unto me. Psalm 56:11 And I say unto you my friends, Be not afraid of them that kill the body, and after that have no more that they can do. Luke 12:4 The cool thing: there are 365 Fear Not's in the Bible. List 365. Blog post. Then there is the hard part. But I say unto you, Love your enemies, bless them that curse you, do good to them that hate you, and pray for them which despitefully use you, and persecute you; Matthew 5:44 We will be praying for all of you.
  8. lynnmosher

    Prayers

    From what I've read/heard, there were two of them. And that is doubly scary. I can't believe that judge let them go. Unbelievable! Surely praying for the safety of all children and adults in your area and anywhere else these two crazies may go.
  9. Seth Kendrick

    Prayers

    Hey guys, I don’t know if any of you heard but a man arrested for training children to commit mass shootings at schools was recently released from prison. I live in the area around his compound, and I’m scared he will do something rash to enact his revenge on those who arrested him. Please pray that neither my school, nor any other school in this area becomes a target of his.
  10. David Watkins

    Hello From A Former Game Developer

    Welcome, TD!
  11. David Watkins

    Nice To Meet You :)

    Hi Debbi. Welcome!
  12. lynnmosher

    Nice To Meet You :)

    Welcome to our writing family, Debbi. Glad you joined us. So sorry you went through that with Tate. You'll find plenty of help, support, and encouragement around here, so roam around and make yourself at home. Blessings on your writing!
  13. lynnmosher

    More Mangled Language Uses

    Yeah, Carolina, I'm with you. I guess it's another one of those grammar changes that happen over the years. Champing just doesn't sound right.
  14. lynnmosher

    Sample Article

    What are the specifics? Who is this for? Can you share with us a few of the details of who or what this is for?,.It's a little difficult to give an answer without specifics.
  15. Katherine Johnston

    Nice To Meet You :)

    Welcome!
  16. Katherine Johnston

    Hello From A Former Game Developer

    Welcome!
  17. Rebecca

    Nice To Meet You :)

    Welcome, Debbi! It's great to have you here.
  18. Alley

    Nice To Meet You :)

    Welcome! It's nice to meet you.
  19. c taylor

    When God Came Down for a Visit

    the nativity story based on a scene from the movie "the perfect gift" by Kelly Film studios. also available in spanish.
  20. c taylor

    Livin' Large in Babylon

    Christians take some lessons from Daniel on navigating the everyday world of business and politics and the faith.
  21. c taylor

    Year of the Silence

    after another tragedy, a church decides to become a "good Samaritan" by doing good without fanfare and the neighborhood begins to change....
  22. carolinamtne

    More Mangled Language Uses

    Thank you, Tom, and thank you, Lynn. The chomping/champing surprises me. Chomping is eating, chewing. I've watched many a horse chewing on the bit, so chomping makes sense to me. Champing, to champ, I need to investigate. champ (chămp) ► v. To bite or chew upon noisily. See Synonyms at bite. v. To work the jaws and teeth vigorously. idiom champ at the bit To show impatience at being held back or delayed. More at Wordnik from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition So ... which came first? (More investigation) champ (v.) 1520s, "to chew noisily, crunch;" 1570s (of horses) "to bite repeatedly and impatiently," probably echoic; OED suggests a connection with jam (v.). Earlier also cham, chamb, etc. (late 14c.). To champ on (or at) the bit, as an eager horse will, is attested in the figurative sense by 1640s. Related: Champed; champing. As a noun, "act of biting repeatedly, action of champing," from c. 1600. chomp (v) 1640s, dialectal and American English variant of champ (v.). Related: Chomped; chomping. (etymonline.com) Does this resolve anything? (I don't think so, but it was fun doing the research.)
  23. c taylor

    Grandkids in a Box

    grandma is missing her grandkids. she dreams she receives a special delivery which turns out to be her beloved wee ones. they spend the day having a blast and then she has to return them .
  24. Debbi

    Nice To Meet You :)

    My name is Debbi, and I have published one book ( Child of Promise ) through Tate. Yes, THAT Tate :( It started well in 2008, but by the end it was heartbreaking. I've had a few short stories published over the years, but now I am working on a larger project: a series of YA novels in the mystery, romance genre. I'll be hopping over to the projects threads to look for a beta reader if anyone wants to meet me over there :) I look forward to getting to know you! Blessings, Debbi
  25. Mattie Shaw

    Sample Article

    Hello Everyone, I hope everybody is having a wonderfully, blessed day. I would like to write a sample article to have to submit when answering a ad for writers. Can some of you veteran/experts elaborate on that process. I just feel so timid when I think of writing something to submit to an expert or a professional, potential boss. Help! Blessings, Mattie
  26. ISounds like space opera. My qualifications? I've read this stuff since I was eleven, and I'm now 63. My current project is an alternate history of the War of Armenian Succession, 63 ACE. I also have a first contact story and a near future/cyberpunk story in the works.
  27. This is from GrammarBook.com ... This column is mostly concerned about the written word, but even so, pronunciation will inevitably enter the picture from time to time. The expressions chomping at the bit and stomping ground are both corruptions of the original champing and stamping. People find this incredible. But, for instance, consult the 1961 cult-favorite western film One-Eyed Jacks, and you’ll hear Marlon Brando clearly say, “I know all his old stampin’ grounds.” My 1968 Random House dictionary and my 1980 American Heritage dictionary (the one with its own usage panel) don’t even list stomping ground, only stamping. Nor do they list chomping at the bit, only champing. My 1999 Webster’s lists both, but Webster’s is more permissive by design; it’s what’s called a descriptive dictionary, as opposed to prescriptive ones like American Heritage, which presume, unlike Webster’s, to act as guardians of proper English. Here are some more words and phrases that make word nerds wince: Kudos To this great man, kudos are overdue. That’s not a sentence that would raise many eyebrows, but kudos is not the plural of kudo. There’s no such thing as a kudo. Kudos is a Greek word (pronounced KYOO-doss or KOO-doss) meaning praise or glory, and you’d no more say kudos are due than you’d say glory are due. You must change are to is: kudos is overdue. Of course, if you ever said that, everybody’d think you’re strange—everybody but that word nerd skulking in the corner. Snuck A lot of people these days think this is the legitimate past tense of sneak. A lot of people are wrong. The past tense of sneak is sneaked. Even my Webster’s has a problem with snuck, calling it “informal.” Flaunt, flout He was a rebel who flaunted the rules. Make that flouted. To flaunt is to display ostentatiously; to flout is to ignore, disregard. Don’t flaunt your ignorance by flouting the correct usage of flout. Close proximity Also commonly used by a lot of smart folks who should know better. There is a creek in close proximity to the cabin. This is ill-advised for a number of reasons. First, proximity already means “closeness,” so the phrase is redundant: “close closeness.” And this is just an affected way of disdaining nice clear words like near, nearby, et al. What’s wrong with “There’s a creek near the cabin”? Word nerds believe that the fewer words and syllables it takes to get your point across, the better a writer you’ll be. More importantly, most importantly When grammatical cluelessness combines with a desire to sound glib, we get maddening phrases like these two. I’ve been a pedantic prig, er, copy editor, a long time and I’ve never seen a valid use of more or most importantly. Just drop the -ly and make my day. More important, you’ll be using good English. Most important, you won’t sound like some pseudo-scholarly fusspot. This grammar tip is by our late copy editor and word nerd Tom Stern.
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